The Hawaiian bobtail squid, or Euprymna scolopes, is a member of the order, Sepiolida.

Euprymna scolopes
Euprymna scolopes

Nicknames: Hawaiian Bobtail Squid

Description: Euprymna scolopes grows 30 millimeter long mantles. It does not weigh much, considering at adult stage, it barely reaches 3 grams. As a cephalopod, it has bilateral symmetry and a prominent head. Euprymna scolopes has eight-suckered arms, very round mantles and a miniscule size. It's color is influenced by the bioluminescent bacteria, called Vibrio fisheri, covering it. It feeds the bacteria a sugar and amino acid solution, in exchange for hiding the squid's silhouette when looked at from below by matching the amount of light hitting the top of the mantle. This mutualistic relationship is characteristic of this species in particular.

It has a light organ, which is stimulated by light and responds to Vibrio fisheri's luminescence. It uses its extra-ocular vesicles and eyes to pay attention to where light is coming from and maintain a certain level of output light. Reflector and lens tissues in the light organ assist in reflecting and focusing light through the ventral side of the mantle. Studies have shown that this organ exhibits similarities to the mammalian eye in terms of genetic make-up.

Habitat: Euprymna scolopes lives in shallow coastal waters in the central Pacific region. It is primarily situated in the Hawaiian islands. It is the typical mollusk residence.

Niche: It feeds on shrimp, prawn and certain octopuses. It can also eat mysids, which are small, shrimp-like crustaceans. Hawaiian monk seals are Euprymna scolopes's natural predator. It is not consumed like other squids humans tend to eat. That is probably due to its small size and symbiotic relationship with bacteria.


Structure of a Squid
Structure of a Squid

Reproduction: Euprymna scolopes reproduces in the typical way that squids produce; It spawns. They attract females and use their special arm to fertilize her. A special ink gland under the female' beak receives the sperm. The eggs are laid on seaweed and even on other egg cases; It just depends on what's available. The adults may die after spawning and many newly-hatched squids are preyed upon.
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